The Spectacular 10 US Military Ships Ready to Rule the Seas in 2023!

In the year 2021, four U.S. naval vessels were commissioned. In 2022, the USA commissioned six naval vessels. However, in 2023, ten U.S. military naval vessels are expected to be commissioned this year.

Here is a list of The Spectacular 10 US Military Ships Ready to Rule the Seas in 2023

1. USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

 The Spectacular 10 US Military Ships Ready to Rule the Seas in 2023!

She is a Freedom-class littoral combat ship of the United States Navy. She is the first Navy vessel to bear the name Cooperstown, New York. The industry team led by Lockheed Martin designed and delivered the ship, which is the 12th Freedom-variant Littoral Combat Ship. The U.S. Navy accepted the future USS Cooperstown (LCS 23) delivery at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard in Marinette, Wisconsin, on September 20, 2022. She will now sail to New York for its official commissioning ceremony this year, followed by its journey to her homeport in Mayport, Florida.

 

USS Marinette (LCS-25)

 The Spectacular 10 US Military Ships Ready to Rule the Seas in 2023!

She will be a Freedom-class littoral combat ship of the U.S. Navy. Her commissioning is scheduled for June 2023, according to the Navy release. She completed her acceptance trial in November last year, during which the ship tested its systems, including main propulsion and electrical systems. Several operational capability demonstrations, such as a full power demonstration, were also carried out. The Navy accepted delivery after these successful trials and will continue post-delivery certifications and qualifications to ready her for fleet operations.

USS Nantucket (LCS-27)

 The Spectacular 10 US Military Ships Ready to Rule the Seas in 2023!

She will be a Freedom-class littoral combat ship of the United States Navy. She will be the third commissioned ship in naval service named after Nantucket. She is the fourteenth Freedom-class littoral combat ship to be built. Marinette Marine was awarded the contract to build the ship on October 6, 2017. The ship was laid down on October 9, 2019, and it was christened and released into the Menominee River on August 7, 2021. She is anticipated to enter service this year in 2023, assuming everything goes according to plan.

USS Canberra (LCS-30)

She is an Independence-class littoral combat ship of the United States Navy. She is the second U.S. ship to be named Canberra, after the Australian cruiser HMAS Canberra, which was named after the Australian capital city and sunk during the Battle of Savo Island. Canberra was built in Mobile, Alabama, by Austal USA. She was christened on June 5, 2021. The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of the ship at Austal USA’s facilities in Mobile on December 21, 2021. On June 22, 2022, Canberra arrived at San Diego Naval Base, its home port. Now, it is scheduled to be commissioned in 2023.

USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795)

This will be the second vessel of the U.S. Navy’s Virginia-class nuclear-powered attack submarines to be named in honor of Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, the father of the nuclear Navy. Rickover served in the Navy for 63 years on active duty. His views touched on matters of design, propulsion, education, personnel, and professional standards. The SSN 795 was christened on July 31, 2021, at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut and is expected to enter service this year if everything goes as planned.

USS New Jersey (SSN-796)

This is a nuclear-powered Virginia-class attack submarine, which is the third U.S. Navy vessel named for the state of New Jersey. On April 14, 2022, she was launched after her christening on November 13; New Jersey is the first U.S. Navy attack submarine designed for a mixed-gender crew. The first female submariners in the U.S. Navy were on ballistic missile submarines, such as USS Wyoming (SSBN-742), back in 2011. The U.S. Navy received New Jersey in late 2022 and should be commissioned this year.

USS Carl M. Levin (DDG 120)

This one is the 70th destroyer in the Arleigh Burke class of the United States Navy’s Flight IIA guided missile fleet. Carl M. Levin was christened at the Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, on October 2, 2021. She is the 42nd Flight IIA ship and the fifth of the “technology insertion” builds with elements of the follow-on Flight III series. She installed an Aegis Combat System baseline 9 with integrated air and missile defense capabilities. Carl M. Levin finished her sea trials on December 9, 2022, and her commissioning is scheduled for spring 2023.

USS John Basilone (DDG-122)

This is an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer in the U.S. Navy. She is the 72nd ship in her class and was given the name John Basilone in honor of US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone, who earned the Medal of Honor for his conduct during the Guadalcanal Campaign in the Pacific War. She was christened in a ceremony held on June 18, 2022, and is expected to enter service this year if everything goes as planned.

USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125)

She will be the first Flight III variant and 75th overall Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. She is named after Captain Jacklyn H. Lucas, a recipient of the Medal of Honor. She was launched on June 4, 2021, and christened on March 26, 2022. The U.S. Navy has not provided the exact date of her commissioning, but she is expected to enter the fleet in 2023. The Flight III upgrade focuses on the AN/SPY-6(V)1 Air and Missile Defense Radar, which enhances electrical and cooling capacities and provides other related enhancements to improve warfighting capability significantly.

10. USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)

She is the second Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier being built for the U.S. Navy. It is expected to enter service in 2023 if everything goes as planned. The USS John F. Kennedy will continue the legacy of highly capable nuclear-powered aircraft carrier platforms.

Ford-class enhancements incorporated into the design include flight deck changes and improved weapons handling systems. This class also features new nuclear power plants, increased electrical power generation capacity, allowance for future technologies, and reduced workload for sailors, resulting in a smaller crew size and reduced operating costs for the Navy.