German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has stated that there are restrictions on using Western-supplied weapons to Ukraine by Kyiv forces in the war. The Russian media picked up his comments.

“It is very important to us that the weapons we supply and with which Ukraine can defend itself are not used to attack Russian territory,” Scholz said in Bendorf near Koblenz in western Germany on Tuesday, according to reports.

In April, German Defense Minister Boris Pistorius had expressed limited support for Ukraine carrying out operations on Russian soil “to cut off its supply routes.” The German newspaper Die Zeit reported that Pistorius said this was “as long as cities, civilians, civilian objects are not attacked.”

Also, last month, the United States said it supported Ukrainian attacks on the Donbas and Crimea region, as they are under Russian occupation. However, the United States did not encourage attacks outside of Ukraine, according to White House spokesman John Kirby.

On Tuesday, Kremlin press secretary Dmitri Peskov told reporters that Germany could not guarantee that its weapons would not be used on Russian soil.

Scholz said the West was in agreement that NATO and Moscow should not escalate or come into conflict over backing for Kyiv. He also said that Berlin had chosen to ship weapons to Ukraine “acting in concert with our partners.” Scholz has stated that beginning in the month of August, Germany will ship ammunition for Ukrainian SAU systems.

Berlin has provided substantial military aid to Ukraine; nevertheless, Scholz was criticized early in the conflict for allegedly taking too long to agree to equip Ukraine with some crucial weapons, including Leopard 2 tanks.

Berlin has provided substantial military aid to Ukraine; nevertheless, Scholz was criticized early in the conflict for allegedly taking too long to agree to equip Ukraine with some crucial weapons, including Leopard 2 tanks.

In April, Kyiv’s allies reiterated their military support for this country at the Ramstein airbase in Germany, ahead of Ukraine’s widely anticipated spring counteroffensive against Russian forces.

Professor Leon Hartwell is currently a visiting scholar at the London School of Economics (LSE) international policy think tank, LSE IDEAS. According to Hartwell, “thus silencing those who are pushing to negotiate” an end to the war is dependent on Ukraine showing its partners that its recent investments are paying off in the form of a successful counter-offensive.

“Ukraine has proven to be tremendously creative and adaptable on the battlefield,” Hartwell stated, “but I believe that a successful spring offensive will be politically significant. It will allow each of the NATO member states to return to their national audience and justify recent and future military support for Ukraine.”

Brendan Cole